Whitman news since 1896

Whitman Wire

Vol. CLIV, Issue 5
Whitman news since 1896

Whitman Wire

Whitman news since 1896

Whitman Wire

Lines are drawn, sexes collide in ‘Jekyll and Hyde’

Whitman has never seen a version of “Jekyll and Hyde” like the one on April 17 and 18: a dance production involving 27 Whitman students divided into good and evil. Paired with hauntingly beautiful music from movies like “Pride and Prejudice” and “Stardust,” the dance production remained consistently dynamic. Varying styles of dance, from modern to ballet to acting, helped distinguish each number.

Some standout numbers include “Brothel Tango,” “Street Scene” and the finale number. These scenes varied in style, but the choreography by senior Seren Pendleton-Knoll and Kerry Pine was highly aware of the movements of the body. The lighting also helped set the scene, like the red lighting which prevailed when Hyde takes over.

Caitlin Feeney, '12, Kelli Kuhlman, '09, Christine Kiely, '12, Lauren Bolkovatz, '10, and Seren Pendleton-Knoll '09 dance like saints as five of the seven virtues in a recent performance of 'Jekyll & Hyde.' The production ran from April 17 to April 18 in Cordiner Hall. Credit: Klein
Caitlin Feeney, '12, Kelli Kuhlman, '09, Christine Kiely, '12, Lauren Bolkovatz, '10, and Seren Pendleton-Knoll '09 dance like saints as five of the seven virtues in a recent performance of 'Jekyll & Hyde.' The production ran from April 17 to April 18 in Cordiner Hall. Credit: Klein

Minimal props, like a flower or a set of test tubes, kept the focus on the dancers and the superb costumes helped distinguish good and evil. The dancers moved in ways that seem almost impossible.

Andrew Claus, a 2003 alum and visiting artist, starred as Jekyll/Hyde and accomplished the difficult task of portraying both evil and good through dance. The dancing and acting blend together so well that it’s difficult to distinguish one from the other. Other standouts included Monica Finney as Chastity and Talia Gottlieb as Lust, the two forces that battled for Jekyll/Hyde’s affections.

The dramatic tension throughout the show never let up until the curtain closed, and the stellar music and lighting choices made this a great production.

The Coriolis Dance Collective also performed before the Jekyll and Hyde production. The Seattle-based non-profit organization performed four numbers that were interesting and dynamic, further proving that the human body is capable of moving in ways that never seemed possible.

Overall, the production at Cordiner Hall engaged the senses and the stellar production values made this one of my favorite dance performances this year.

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