Senior accused of drug, child porn posession

Gillian Frew and Kim Sommers

David Carlisle | Courtesy of Whitman CollegeWhen junior Margaux Cameron was house hunting at the start of last semester, the student who placed a listserv ad for a single seemed helpful and friendly.

“He posted a listing on the listserv saying he had a one bedroom place, so I said I’d go look at it,” she said. “It was a little ways off campus so he picked me up and drove me to the apartment building. It wasn’t really what I was looking for, so I told him that I was just looking for something closer to campus.”

The student, David Carlisle, 33, was scheduled to appear in court on Monday, Sept. 15 to address accusations of steroid, marijuana, and child pornography possession. According to Walla Walla County Clerk Kathy Martin, however, Carlisle did not make his court date, and a warrant has now been issued for his arrest.

In 2003, Carlisle pleaded guilty to a charge of third-degree child molestation, as reported by the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin. These most recent criminal charges are the result of an investigation that began last spring. During a search of Carlisle’s residence, police uncovered what appeared to be infant marijuana plants and documents related to both the manufacture of marijuana and to steroid usage. A court document reveals that police also found a laptop computer containing 19 images of minors engaged in sexually explicit activity, as well as files suggesting Carlisle purchased the steroids over the Internet.

Carlisle’s enrollment at Whitman was confirmed by Assistant to the Dean of Students Donna Cummins and by Jennifer McNeil of the college registrar’s office. Both administrative offices further confirmed that Carlisle was registered for this Fall 2008 semester, but would not release additional information.

Carlisle identifies himself on his Facebook page as a member of the Whitman class of 2009 and an Economics major.

Despite his criminal background, campus security asserts it is not concerned about Carlisle’s presence on campus and has not taken any special action to protect students.

“His crime is not related to something that is deemed a risk to the students,” said Craig McKinnon, Associate Director of Security.

Federal law mandates that institutions of higher education must provide students with information on how to access state records on sexual offenders, but are not required to disclose students’ personal information.

Cameron, like others on campus, was taken aback by recent revelations about Carlisle’s past.
She recalled e-mailing Carlisle last spring to let him know that she had found alternate housing arrangements and would not be leasing from him.

“I said for sure that I wasn’t interested. He was just like, ‘I’m really glad you found what you were looking for, and it was nice meeting you.’ He seemed really nice. I didn’t know he was so much older than us until he mentioned he had gone to high school with a staff member on campus.”

According to McKinnon, Carlisle’s current whereabouts are unknown.